If I were a toy

Coolhunts

Pink
Blue
Dolls
Cars
Dresses
Building blocks
Kitchen
Soccer

Each item is associated with either girls or boys and I assume that you don’t experience any difficulties by categorizing them. Girls’ toys are associated with physical attractiveness, nurturing, and domestic skill, whereas boys’ toys were rated as violent, competitive, exciting, and somewhat dangerous. Of course, it is a fact that boys generally have more testosterone. This explains why they are more engaged with competition and sometimes aggression.

But in my opinion, this knowledge is being extremely magnified by the media and the gender-stereotyped toy marketing. It isn’t so obvious anymore that cleaning belongs to women and that men are the breadwinners of the family. So why is this still a common image in the toy store flyers?

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That’s why I love the new commercial from Smyths Toys UK. It shows a little boy singing his own version of Beyonce’s ‘If I Were A Boy’, where he imagines what life would be liked if he was a toy for one day. The boy flies through space as a rocket, but he’s also dressing up as a queen in a pink dress and crown before waving to his subjects from the roof of a castle.

It’s just a fraction of the commercial but I believe that it has been a very conscious choice of the store and they are making the first step toward the gender neutrality trend.

It is already visible in the fashion world and every new signal in a different area confirms this trend more and more. Kids should decide for themselves what they think is fun.

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Dress to impress

Coolhunts

It is impossible to win the war on static hair when I have to try five outfits in a fitting room. Besides, shopping is just exhausting. The Dutch warehouse De Bijenkorf will ease this (third world) problem: they designed (as a tryout) a virtual fitting room. Thanks to 3D technology, customers can digitally experience how the new summer collection fits their body. The try out fitting room will make a tour in Amsterdam, Den Haag, Rotterdam and Eindhoven.

I think it is cool, because De Bijenkorf is the first in The Netherlands with a virtual fitting room. As I said before, this is just a try out. After watching the video, I would really like to try it. Customers see themselves on a big screen with sensors. However, I think the technology could be improved, I am questioning if it’s realistic and accurate enough.

Virtual fitting rooms have future growth potential. The world gets faster and faster, our agendas get fuller and fuller. All women love shopping, but there should be a possibility to do it faster. I still love the ‘old fashioned’ way of shopping as well, so we shouldn’t get rid of the ‘normal’ fitting rooms.